Sixty Seconds on Songwriting with Alice’s Night Circus

Juggling a smorgasbord of influences with a pop sensibility, Alice’s Night Circus walks the tightrope between her theatrical world and the mainstream sound-du-jour. Like Panic! At The Disco who married debauchery and cabaret with pop prowess, and Muse who converted a fascination for space into cabinets of album awards, ringmaster Julia Scott is attempting to lure the mainstream into her conceptual world of circus and theatrics. With her debut album ‘Metamorphose’ on the horizon, we delve deeper into Alice’s world…

In a handful of words, tell us what ‘Metamorphose’ is about?

The album is a form of escapism whilst encouraging people to embrace their creativity and individuality.

Where do you draw your inspiration from?

Whilst I have been classically trained as a singer my music taste is very eclectic. This ranges from opera and musicals to pop, jazz and symphonic metal and everything in-between, which means my music is very diverse. I have taken heavy influence from visual styles such as steampunk, vintage, circus, film and television.

How has living with ME (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis) permeated into your music?

I used [my illness] to inspire the song ‘Medusa’ and it also features subtly in some of my other songs.

How have you married your love for Steampunk with your music?

‘Penny Dreadful’ is inspired by my love of the Victorian macabre and old horror stories.  Some of my fans have even created their own costumes to allow them to portray the song characters Mr Strange and Penny. A number of belly dancing and burlesque troupes have created routines to this track. A further fan created a Jig Doll for a video which he has since gifted to me. I create my own stage costumes and accessories as well as create other outfits for Comic Cons and Steampunk events.

Alice will be appearing as herself in a fine art photography project based around steampunks. Find out more about Gary Nicholls’ The Imaginarium here.

Follow Alice’s Night Circus:

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/400uDlpep629T3L02HdJtr

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnyOy98XOqXty8L8y49otwA

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/alicesnightcircus/

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/alicencircus

Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/curiousbyalice/

Website:  www.alicesnightcircus.com

Sixty Seconds on Songwriting with Adam Lanceley

If a songwriter is only as effective as the stories they tell, Adam Lanceley will have his songs etched into your mind in no time. His latest album Epitaph to Innocence is his seventh to date, despite suffering life-changing injuries from a car crash many years ago. Against all odds, Adam not only proved them wrong but has taken his remarkable recovery to the extreme, running marathons and now carving out a career as a singer-songwriter. We catch up with Adam to find out how he channeled his trauma into art…

What inspired you to start writing music?

When I was 10, I had a severe car crash which I was not expected to recover from. Other people will tell me what an amazing recovery I’ve made but to be honest I don’t really think about it like that. Music has always been both powerful in helping me deal with the things life’s thrown at me.

You’re notoriously elusive about the meaning behind your songs. What’s the reason for this?

I always think rather than explain to people what your songs are about, it makes them far more interesting if you keep a little bit of mystery behind them and let the listener decide what they think it means.

You’ve written and released seven full-length albums. Are you still seeing development in your work?

In this album, I hope you’ll be able to notice a progression in both the production and delivery if you compare it to my earlier stuff. I am very keen on exploring new sounds and use of instruments to keep my music fresh.

Which artists dominated your record collection when you were growing up?

It would be a lie to say that I’ve always been passionate about music. My taste, though, has always been ‘old skool’ – going back to Roy Orbison and Elvis Presley. It was when I first heard ‘The Beach Boys’ that my interest in music – particularly, 1960’s West Coast music started to increase. The 3 albums that mean the most to me, I would say, would have to be really thought provoking, reflective ones. Pet Sounds, Bridge Over Troubled Water and Hotel California.

Follow Adam Lanceley:

iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/gb/artist/adam-lanceley/id569012210

Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/adam-129087330

Twitter: https://twitter.com/adamlanceley

Interview: Kelly Oliver

Kelly Oliver PRHaving only started gigging in May last year, folk singer-songwriter Kelly Oliver has made quite an impact. Within months of starting she found herself invited to open Folkstock Festival before, incredibly, bagging herself a spot at the prestigious Cambridge Folk Festival. It marks a mighty rise for someone who has been on the circuit for less than a year, and with single ‘He Walked on the Side of the Sea’ out March 17th, we took the chance to ask her a few questions.
 
Many of our readers won’t have heard of your music before, how would you describe your sound?
I would say it’s influenced by traditional folk music. Traditional Irish folk music definitely, but I do have country influences. I’m influenced a lot by Dolly Parton, and people like Kenny Rogers, singers like Alison Krauss and Cara Dillon. But I think the way I write songs is influenced a lot by Irish folk music, the traditional ways. Really I take influences from all sorts, so I’m not sure how I’d describe it but that’s probably the best way.
 
The upcoming single ‘He Walked on the Side of the Sea’ features BBC Folk Awards Musician of the Year nominee Will Pound on Harmonica. How did that collaboration come about?
That was through Twitter! I followed him on Twitter – I was a fan of his a little bit before – and because I play harmonica I’d already had the song recorded [for EP ‘Far From Home – Ed]. But my manager just approached him to see if he wanted to do a collaboration, we sent him the song and he agreed. So it was quite quickly done actually, it was really good fun.
 
Your rise since starting out last year has been stratospheric – did you have any inkling you’d get the reaction you have when you started out?
Not at all. I went travelling basically, and once I went I decided while I was out there that I wanted to at least have a go at the music. I didn’t know anything, I never thought what could happen. At the beginning I just focussed on trying to do gigs, got myself a Facebook stage and started at the bottom really. Started with trying to promote myself online and approach people for gigs. I guess it’s the same way every musician starts, so I never thought I would even have the chance to record an EP let alone the things that have come from that so it was really shocking!
 
‘He Walked on the Side of the Sea’ was originally released, minus Will Pound, as part of your EP ‘Far From Home’, which has been a big part of your success so far. Do you have any plans for a follow up as yet?
Yeah, we do. There’s going to be an album that will be recorded and released this year. I have got some songs that I’m looking to put on there but then there might be some that I haven’t written yet, depending on finding the time to write and record.
 
Where is the best place to find your music online?
My website is www.kellyoliver.co.uk, and from there there’re links to my Facebook page, my Twitter and Soundcloud.
You can listen to ‘He Walked in the Side of the Sea’ here: https://soundcloud.com/kellyoliver/kelly-oliver-ft-will-pound-he
And it can also be found on Amazon and iTunes.