“The Revolution Will Be Live!” – Malik & The O.G.’s come to Cambridge.

The revolution will not be televised… but it will be at Cambridge Jazz Festival this upcoming weekend as Malik & the O.G.’s prepare a run of events at the festival celebrating the work of Gil Scott-Heron.

The upcoming appearance at Cambridge Jazz Festival include multiple seminars, talks and performance by Malik Al Nasir, showcasing why Gil Scott-Heron is still relevant to artists  as well as social politics today.

Gil Scott-Herons most notable work comes in the form of “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised”, a spoken word track released in 1971 – it’s free form style and spoken-word, poetic approach to lyricism within music is an example of breaking down the wall between music and art, the song is not only musically but literarily insightful.

“The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” holds lyrical significance even by today’s musical standards, whilst contemporary lyricism is more explicit and straight forward. The message it gave was a public one and that if there was going to be a revolution within 1970s America is not going to be televised; it was going to stare you in the face and it was going to be real.

“The Revolution will be not be re-run, the revolution will be live.” Are the final words of the iconic track that Gil Scott-Heron is most notable for – it’s a message that still holds strong within the current socio-political climate within America.

Malik Al Nasir who was Gil Scott-Heron’s protégé is currently following in his footsteps, delivering a message that is direct, insightful as well as artistic.

Malik Al Nasir is a Guyanese activist, poet and filmmaker from Liverpool, following in his mentors footsteps; Malik’s work Malik discusses how colonialism and slavery destroys identity, he also establishes the significance of genealogy, anthropology and DNA as an insight into “who we actually are” as well celebrating our inherited roots and cultural identity without anyone else dictating otherwise – using his Guyanese roots as an example of claiming his heritage and being self-aware of one’s cultural inheritance.

“My own journey back to Guyana to re-connect with my South American roots, was actually both a quest for lost family ties and a search for historical truth. Discovering I had an indigenous Amerindian grandmother, further complicated an already convoluted sense of self and the discovery of my Scottish aristocratic slave-owner ancestry, will offer the basis of a paradigm shift in how we view Transatlantic slavery – as it was practiced in Demerera South America.”

Malik will also explore the significance of the “Black Arts Movement” in America and how he contributes to that via Gil Scott-Heron and the Last Poets – with his role as an activist in breaking down colonialism and its control over identity.

Malik will be running an “Artist as Activists seminar” at the University of Cambridge, Centre of Latin American studies at 5pm on the 17th of November. “The Revolution Will Be Live!” will take place on the 18th of November at 8:30pm, Cambridge Wine Merchants. Finally Classic Album Sundays event; a tribute to Gil Scott-Heron will be running two events on the 19th of November at 2pm, Hidden Rooms, and 8pm Arts Picture house.

Links to tickets for these events can be found here;

https://www.cambridgejazzfestival.info/malik-the-o-g-s – “The Revolution Will Be Live!” tickets.

http://skiddle.com/e/13023561 – “Classic Album Sundays” @ Hidden Rooms

Free – “Artists as Activists”

You can keep up to date with the events at Malik’s social network links found below;

https://www.facebook.com/Malik-The-OGs-171722166201820/

https://twitter.com/MalikAndTheOGs?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor

http://malikandtheogs.blogspot.co.uk/

Homerik – Genre defying metal from New York

If you need a band to redefine a genre, Homerik are the guys you’ve been looking for. Their exciting new sound takes everything you knew about metal and turns it on its head, leaving you shell shocked and wondering where exactly it is that your mind was just led.

Watch their epic video to “A Song of the Night Part 1 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVJy5wQtvEA

With a fully orchestral sound, they have three interweaving vocalists in their ranks, as well as guest sopranos and a shadowy cast of what sounds like hundreds. Using traditional ethnic instrumentation from Africa and the Far East, this is more than melodic metal, it’s something which injects the whole metal genre with new life (or maybe death). With potent, pronged riffs, arresting vocals and a chanteuse singing in Ancient Egyptian, Homerik are a truly unique sonic experience. Homerik’s symphonic progressive death metal is the new dark corner of metal which was waiting to be explored – cinematic; vicious, but brutally beautiful.

Be sure to pick up their new album and Keep up with Homerik here:

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/1Ry0Y2JiVXjpidTHDpYVQx

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUcYLfk1tEX4vli_KWUzsBQ

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/homerikofficial/

Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/homerikofficial/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/homerikofficial/

Website: https://www.homerik.org/

 

Introducing Classical Music’s Enfant Terrible, Roger Rudenstein

Roger Rudenstein is not what many people would expect from a classical composer and musician. Not for him the polite, white-gloved bowing and strict adherance to convention, nor even the generic inspirations of stately events and environment. Instead, for the last few years, he has been systematically documenting his views on the political climate in America both in streams-of consciousness blog posts and the less 21st Century method of opera.

His impressively populated back catalogue is creaking at the seams with piano sonatas, concerti, string quartets and symphonies but it’s his grander, more epic works which have really got tongues wagging in America.

In the wake of the 9/11 tragedy, Roger set about documenting his observations of the chaos in the corridors of power. The title and idea for this opus is based on a Goya etching entitled “The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters” which depicts a man who sleeps while monstrous forms fly about. Collectively titled State of the Union, his septet, Nightmare of Reason, uses George W Bush’s actual state of the union address text and puts it to Roger’s composition, which utilises 3 voices as well as perhaps the world’s leading clarinetist, Richard Stoltzman.

Having dealt with Bush, it is perhaps no surprise that current Leader of the Free World comes next under Roger’s microscope, the thinly-veiled The Rise & Fall of Ronald P. Glumph, a Faust-inspired exploration of Donald Trump’s ‘activities’ over four operas. On a completely different tac, Roger also composed an opera based on the effects of the AIDS virus on people’s lives, to great critical acclaim.

Roger is now ready to inspire European audiences with an opera based not on political satire but classic British literature, James Joyce’s classic epic, Ulysses. The source material is an ever-twisting tale of early 20th Irish folk, with much of the dialogue being the internal thoughts of the characters, a perfect device for opera to exploit.

Ulysses is not short of what might politely be called ‘bawdy’ language and behaviour, much of which, you’ll be pleased to hear, is left intact, Roger being keen that the original text by Joyce is undiluted and can reach an audience which may not be familiar with the work, but which is as hilarious today as it was nearly 100 years ago. Ulysses is begging to be heard by a new audience, combining the tragedy and humour of the novel with Roger’s brilliant music, which echoes his very European influences of Richard Strauss, Stravinsky and Schubert.

SoundCloud https://soundcloud.com/rudenste/tracks
Youtube https://www.youtube.com/user/rudenste
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/roger.rudenstein
Website https://www.rogerrudensteinmusic.com/

 

Jak Chantler prepares to don his ‘Shell Suit’ in his latest release with Short Sharp Scratch.

Jak Chantler of former Kerrang’s ‘Best Unsigned Band’ Kingskin is prepare for the launch of his new project Short Sharp Scratch, with the release of ‘Shell Suit’ and the upcoming EP of the same name.

With Short Sharp Scratch, Chantler is stepping away from the alternative rock sounds of Kingskin and has crafted a soulful pop sound that juxtaposes his last musical outfit.

Writing new tunes since before Kingskins break-up, Chantler has also enjoyed success working alongside Charlie Andrew of Alt J and Madness fame and has also had high profile guitar performances in front of the likes of James Corden, Rick Astley & Gordon Ramsey.

With ‘Shell Suit’, Chantler has crafted a sound that is initially a throwback to the classic soulful-funky sound of the 70’s and 80’s akin to Chaka Khan. Yet the song instantly finds its place among recent pop classics such as Childish Gambino and his latest release to the likes of indie-pop sounds from Haim.

The engaging instrumental is accompanied by powerful vocals that really drive the soul of the song home whilst giving it a contemporary touch.

The song is a charming nostalgia trip to fans of the party anthems of old yet is also a fresh re-imagining with a modern take; yet the song remains authentic both the soul and pop influences of this track.

Whilst the track & EP releases next month, you can check out a teaser in the form of a live performance at Abbey Road here;

Short Sharp Scratch’s debut EP Shell Suit releases on the 15th of September, for now you can keep up to date with Short Sharp Scratch on the social network links below;

https://twitter.com/Short_Scratch

https://www.facebook.com/shortsharpscratchmusic/

“I don’t need a babysitter!” Temper Cartel channel a guileless rage in their new track ‘Babysitter’

Temper Cartel have thrown their toys out of the pram so to speak with their energetic indie anthem and music video for ‘Babysitter’.

The video was released on the 9th of August, and features a collection of over 40 fans acting out child-like states, having a tantrum, fitting the hectic dynamic of the tune.

The song carries an upbeat and energetic quality throughout, whilst retaining the thrashing sounds of influences such as The Libertines and The Strokes, whilst referencing these names, Temper Cartel solidify their place in modern indie alongside Catfish & the Bottlemen.

The song not only fits in with the lo-fi garage inspired aesthetic of the early noughties but also the often looked over experimental britpop bands of the early 90s, such as Supergrass, infusing a collective sound of alternative rock.

Alongside the vocals features a band with a diverse range of textures coming from each of the instruments, from the Coxon-esque guitar riffs that have an ascending pattern comparable to reaching boiling point: to the thumping sounds of the bass and drum coupling together to drive the song.

When it comes to interpreting the song, director A. Rigozzi interpreted the first line “I don’t need a babysitter!” as relating to an authoritarian government: As such, the song features substance and is a well thought out composition, from a vocalised instrumental section to the lyrical content.

Babysitter by Temper Cartel is out now and you can check out the music video to the single here;

In anticipation of their forthcoming debut album, you can keep up to date on details of that on their social networks;

https://tempercartel.com/

https://soundcloud.com/tempercartel

https://en-gb.facebook.com/tempercartel/

https://twitter.com/tempercartel?lang=en

https://www.instagram.com/tempercartel/

Video of the week: ‘Drop Top’ by Serena Kern

Calling all urban music fans, this is the video for you. ‘Video of the week’ goes to former innocent singer-songwriter Serena Kern, who has now ventured into a totally different style with her grime inspired new track ‘Drop Top’ ft. Ms Banks.

Find out more on Serena Kern here:

Links:

www.serenakern.com

https://www.facebook.com/SerenaKern

https://twitter.com/Serena_Kern

https://www.instagram.com/serena_kern/?hl=en

https://www.vevo.com/watch/serena-kern/drop-top-(produced-by-ayo-beatz)/QMAXQ1503621

New Music Competition Removes Entry Fee

Music Maker.jpg

We’re all about the songwriters here at Songwriter Spotlight and it’s we’re happy to hear that the new music competition platform, Salute Music Makers, is too!

Having launched back in April for contestants to upload their tracks, Salute has been growing its ever expanding empire, building bridges with notable partners including UNILAD, GRM Daily, Tenement TV and events company Continental Drifts. As a result, Salute have been able to get rid of the £20 per track entry fee that they initially instated.

Having always aimed to empower the grassroots songwriters of this world, this has been a huge step for the platform who are now able to offer their unprecedented £50,000 prize to a wider audience.

Feargal Sharkey, who you may remember as lead singer of The Undertones, is fronting the competition, he noted: ‘The level of support and encouragement we have received from the industry since launching our competition has been truly extraordinary. Thanks to the support of our partners, Salute is now in the enviable position to make entry absolutely, 100%, free. Yet again Salute is leading the way in providing proper support and encouragement for the next generation of great British talent. Now is your chance to win a £50,000, no strings attached cash prize and entry is free. One small challenge: just write the best song anyone has ever heard!’

You can find out more on Salute Music Makers here:

https://salutemusic.uk/

www.facebook.com/salutemusicuk/

https://twitter.com/salutemusicUK